Hidden Text messages of the Dress up Room Satires on Jonathan Swift and girl Mary Wortley Montagu

Liz Jansen

Via Dryden to Blake

Uk English

10-01-2013

1415 terms

Hidden Emails of the Dressing Room Satires

On Jonathan Swift and girl Mary Wortley Montagu

Jonathan Swift is among the most famous poets from the eighteenth century. This individual has crafted many epigramme including " The Woman's Dressing Room”. This composition is about a male named Strephon and women named Celia. In the poem, Celia tries to make very little presentable to society whilst Strephon sneaks in her dressing room and generally there discovers exactly what a university vile and dirty animal she actually is, altering his complete picture of women generally speaking. It could be stated that Swift ridicules the relationship among all males and females, using his characters as a symbolisation. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu responded to this poem with a poem of her own. In " The Reasons that Caused Dr . Fast to Write a Poem Referred to as the Lady's Dressing Space. ” The lady portrays Speedy as her version coming from all men and converts his Lady Celia into Betty the prostitute. In her poem, Speedy tries to seduce Betty, however the only method he can be successful is to pay out her for her services. All their act of coitus is actually a disappointment. Swift blames Betty for this and they end up quarreling. This cell phone calls into question how those two poems relate to each other in the message they are offerring. This essay will portray these messages regarding the function of the man in Swift's poem, the role of the man in Montagu's composition, the role of the girl in Swift's poem as well as the role with the woman in Montagu's poem. In Swift's poem the role from the man is usually represented by Strephon. Strephon secretly moves into Celia's dressing area at the beginning of the poem. In line 3 to 4 it is suggested that he catches a glimpse of Celia who is getting dressed. " The goddess by het step issues, Arrayed in ribbons brocade, and tissues. ” These lines portray effectively how Strephon sees ladies. He idealises them as goddess-like creatures, near to perfection. The lack of clothing suggests his lust for girls. However his perception drastically changes following he " took a strict survey” (l. 7) of Celia's room. He now believes badly of ladies in general suggested by the series " All women his description fits” (l. 125). However the finishing of the composition mentions Swift's own view of women rather than that of Strephon saying: " He rapidly would learn to think with this problem, /And bless his ravished eyes to see/Such buy from misunderstandings sprung, /Such gaudy tulip glasses raised from dung. ” (l. 141-145) " He” referring to Strephon and " me” discussing the writer, Swift. It could be said that Fast likes ladies when browsing these lines, but it is more likely (Especially because he refers to ‘blessing your ravishing eyes') that Swift just thinks well of women with regards to their sex appeal. Incidents where say that " From the beginning " The Lady's Dressing Room” can be marked by masculine spectatorship, and women's role because fetish is made implicit[. ]” (Weise). Montagu used Swift to represent the role with the man in her composition. In the introduction to her composition it says that your woman " did not like Speedy. She objected to his politics [], His friendship with Pope [], his vanity (especially at learning important people), and his defiant indecency (which she regarded not only unacceptable for a chef but the sign of low breeding). ” (Norton) Taking these kinds of reasons for dislike into account it becomes apparent she's referring to Quick portraying the role in the man in her poem even though the girl never says his name straight except for it. Therefore , it suggests that the key reason why Swift composed a women malicious poem is due to a unlucky encounter he previously with a woman himself. Furthermore, Montagu reveals her don't like for Swift's picture of ladies, who all pretend being something they are not by mentioning males pretend as much, or even more. This kind of becomes obvious in the lines " And men their talants even now mistaking/The stutterer fancies his speaking. / With admiration oft we all see/Hard features heightened by simply toupée. ”...

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